“That evening we had around 30 casualties, both wounded and dead.
When I was informed about the location of my next field assignment, Yemen, the first thing that came to my mind was a scene in Friends – Chandler lied to his girlfriend that he had to work in Yemen in order to escape from her.
In extreme emergency situations, we may be able to set up additional wards using tents and simple resources within a day, but of course this does not mean that is what we do every single day being on the field, and at least not when I am currently not in an emergency mission, when there are lo
© Marie Tan Kiak LI
Dear Everyone, So it's been a month since I arrived in Chad, and three and a half weeks since making it to the airstrip of Tissi Paradise (as it's fondly known to its MSF inhabitants – expatriate and national staff alike, we
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In Syria, obviously security was also on the top of the list of priorities to be looked after and I have to say I learned the hard way on a couple of things in this area. We had some unfortunate incidents where people came in with weapons. No one was harmed but disturbing to say the least.
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© Nicole TUNG
Our field hospitals in Syria are ‘undercover’. Initially, we were running a hospital inside a cave then it was moved into a non functioning farm – a better location and we could adapt it to reduce the risk of shrapnel or mortar fire.
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© Eric LEUNG
“Everyone is happy when the rain comes.” This is what my assistant told me after the rainstorm last week.
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© Eric LEUNG
Today, I have witnessed South Sudan’s first rainstorm in 2013, which also signified the end of dry season and the beginning of rainy season. By the time I went back to the base, my tent was completely flooded with water and mud, and everything on the floor (backpack, computer, shoes, etc) was soaked. When I was emptying water from my tent, the clinic staffs reported that there were some urgent problems in the clinic – fences collapsed, security light failure, and generator stopped. The logistic team rushed back to the clinic to carry out emergency repairing. It was around nine when we returned to the base, and all of us were completely wet and exhausted. I took a shower and went to bed immediately, without even checking whether my computer still work or not.
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© Eric LEUNG
Finally arrived the project location–Doro Refugee Camp, South Sudan. It was a long journey, which took 3 days, including 5 transits (in Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Addis Ababa and Juba) and 4 briefings. I was really surprised by the amount of resources and manpower required just to send an expatriate to the field, and it makes me wonder how complicated and difficult it is for MSF to launch a project.
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