(Continue of Gogrial - Paradise of kindness and brutality (1) ) As there are only two doctors, me and another Burmese physician Kyi, weekend rest days do not really exist. 
The mornings begin with stepping out of my tukul (mud hut), blinking sleepily against the brilliant violets and roaring oranges of an African sunrise. The glorious glow illuminates the sharp rays of towering palm tree fronds, ripe with heavy and sweet oval fruit that tastes like mangoes.
Before I could see him, I could hear his screams coming towards us through the fabric of the field clinic tent. Carried in a standard issue dark thermal blanket by four young men; he was in tears, screaming and writhing in agony.
A mother fleeing mass killings was raped by a soldier in the chaos of a country at civil war, and was shunned by her family and community on returning home during a tenuous ceasefire. She had no education to support herself to overcome poverty or find work.
Our team in Kabo was a mix of nine different nationalities, with different cultures and personalities, and most of them were fluent in French and I wasn’t. But we’re all flexible enough to meet each other halfway.
I could no longer count the times I was put in a stressful situation as part of my job at MSF.
I left the Philippines on 24 September 2015 to get to my new project at the Central African Republic, my second mission with MSF. Although I was excited, I still felt the butterflies, anxious of the uncertain, of not knowing what to expect when I get to work.
Dr Evangeline Cua is a surgeon from the Philippines in MSF’s Kunduz Trauma Centre in Afghanistan when U.S. airstrikes destroyed the hospital on 3 October.
Saada is an area controlled by anti-government Houthi forces that was experiencing almost daily attacks from Coalition air forces. These air strikes were often close to our facilities and we clearly felt their effects.

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