MSF’s Dr Raquel Simakawa, working in an emergency shelter in the Brazilian city of São Paulo, asks who the real villains are in the fight against coronavirus.  
As novel coronavirus (COVID-19) overwhelms some of the world’s most advanced health systems, our teams are adapting our activities to aid those most at risk.
While it’s great to celebrate all the amazing things women can do, we should not forget that women in the Philippines and all over the world still suffer from so much abuse and discrimination. 
Women who are forced from their homes are particularly vulnerable. They have specific health needs that are exacerbated when they are displaced; women on the move lose access to healthcare.
Inaccessibility to treatment and drug resistant bacteria are not the only factors that make tuberculosis challenging to address.
February, the month of love and beating hearts, always makes me contemplate the pacemaker in my chest. I had it in 2013, two months before Supertyphoon “Yolanda”— the tragedy that made me decide to return to humanitarian work for good.
It was the 7th of October, 9 days after a 7.5 magnitude earthquake followed by a 6-meter high tsunami struck and paralyzed Central Sulawesi.  “The death toll (in Central Sulawesi) has risen to 1,900 and climbing,” the TV blared at the Makassar airport just befor
My name is Achmad Yusuf Toba, oftentimes just referred to as Yutub. I am an Indonesian medical doctor and a first-time field worker of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).  I really didn’t know what to expect when I started.

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