Barthelemy is a Burundian refugee and staff member with Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) in Nduta camp, northwestern Tanzania, where MSF is the sole healthcare provider for 75,000 refugees.
In 2017, the world’s attention focused on Myanmar’s Rohingya, ethnic Muslims who are today the largest stateless group in the world.
MSF’s Dr Raquel Simakawa, working in an emergency shelter in the Brazilian city of São Paulo, asks who the real villains are in the fight against coronavirus.  
Zahra Koochizad is the MSF midwife supervisor in the MSF maternity wing of Dasht-e-Barchi hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan.
We at MSF have seen many things while working in Aden: we kept our hospital open during the darkest days of fighting in 2015, and are used to receiving hundreds of wounded in just a few hours, like we did last August.
As novel coronavirus (COVID-19) overwhelms some of the world’s most advanced health systems, our teams are adapting our activities to aid those most at risk.
On various occasions since the Andaman crisis, including during the Bali Process, Malaysia and other South East Asian nations have emphasised the primacy of saving lives at sea. © Stéphane Coletti/MSF
In recent weeks, there have been numerous discussions in Malaysia related to the country’s ability to provide a safe haven for people in need of protection, after having survived a treacherous journey by sea.
“How are you?” is the question I used to start the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) health education and mental health workshops in Hong Kong on coronavirus disease (COVID-19) for the vulnerable populations in the past three months.
Stephanie Goublomme is coordinating MSF’s COVID-19 response in care homes in Brussels, Belgium.

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